Studien 2007

pubmed: studien aus 2007

NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=((((Noise, Transportation[MeSH Terms]) OR transportation noise[MeSH Terms]) OR aircraft noise[Title]) AND Humans[MeSH Terms]) AND ("2007/01/01"[PDAT] : "2007/12/31"[PDAT])
  • Noise exposure and noise induced hearing loss among Kuala Lumpur traffic point duty personnel.
    Related Articles

    Noise exposure and noise induced hearing loss among Kuala Lumpur traffic point duty personnel.

    Med J Malaysia. 2007 Jun;62(2):152-5

    Authors: Thomas N, Mariah AN, Fuad A, Kuljit S, Philip R

    Abstract
    Thirty-two points in Kuala Lumpur were selected where traffic personnel were on duty. Sound level readings were taken three times a day. Generally, the traffic noise levels were between 75 dBA to 85 dBA. The maximum sound level recorded was 108.2 dBA. Noise emitted by traffic equipment and vehicles were up to 133 dBA. Results of audiometric tests revealed that out of 30 who were tested, 24 or 80% were positive for noise-induced hearing loss. A questionnaire survey revealed a lack of knowledge on occupational safety and personal protective equipment.

    PMID: 18705450 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • [Jet engine noise influence on TEOAE in jet engine servicing personnel].
    Related Articles

    [Jet engine noise influence on TEOAE in jet engine servicing personnel].

    Otolaryngol Pol. 2007;61(5):868-71

    Authors: Konopka W, Straszyński P, Jedrzejczak W, Olszewski J

    Abstract
    INTRODUCTION: Jet engine noise may be very harmful to the auditory organ. Transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) seem to be non-invasive, objective and frequency specific audiometric test for evaluating hair cell damage caused by noise and other etiological factors. Sounds of high intensity often cause damage to the organ of Corti. It is well known that the outer hair cells often get damaged first. There are data that OAEs in humans and in animals become weaker after short exposures to noise and OAE measurements appear to be a sensitive method of monitoring the early cochlear changes after noise-induced trauma. The aim was to assess the effects of exposure to jet engine noise on TEOAE and in comparison to PTA in jet engine servicing personnel before and after one year.
    MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study comprised of 40 men exposed to jet engine noise and 20 professional soldiers additionally exposed to impulse nose. Comparative group consisted of 40 men not exposed to noise with normal hearing. TEOAE and PTA were recorded in both group.
    RESULTS: Reductions of TEOAE amplitude were noticed for the both group exposed to noise mainly for the frequencies of 1414 Hz (p < 0.05). The control group did not show any significant audiometric changes neither TEOAE during the time of experiment.
    CONCLUSION: The reduction of TEOAE in individuals exposed to jet engine noise was incommensurably greater than the changes in PTA. The technical personnel participating in jet engine tests (even in the case of a single exposure) are exposed to noise which greatly exceeds permissible and safe levels.

    PMID: 18552037 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • [How does noise affect us? In our health, life styles and environs].
    Related Articles

    [How does noise affect us? In our health, life styles and environs].

    Rev Enferm. 2007 Oct;30(10):13-6, 18-20

    Authors: Murillo IC

    Abstract
    Noise acts by means of the ear on the central and autonomous nervous systems. When this stimulus passes determined limits, it provokes deafness and has pathological effects, both instantaneous and differed, on both nervous systems. At much lower levels, noise produces discomfort, diminishes attention, or impedes communication, concentration and sleep; noise reduces school or professional performance; noise increases the possibility for antisocial behavior; noise can lead to a loss in the value of a building or can cause accidents in the work place. The author describes the importance of this topic, reviews the anatomical-physiological features of the ear, and describes noise and its properties. The author also describes how noise affects our organism, habits, life styles, society, working environment and health. The author finishes by providing some current preventive measures and some recommendations to avoid this pollutant.

    PMID: 18274392 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Evaluating noise in social context: the effect of procedural unfairness on noise annoyance judgments.
    Related Articles

    Evaluating noise in social context: the effect of procedural unfairness on noise annoyance judgments.

    J Acoust Soc Am. 2007 Dec;122(6):3483-94

    Authors: Maris E, Stallen PJ, Vermunt R, Steensma H

    Abstract
    General dosage-response curves typically over- or underestimate the actual prevalence of noise annoyance for specific groups of individuals. The present study applies a social psychological approach to noise annoyance that helps to understand and predict collective deflections from the curve. The approach holds that being exposed to man-made sound is more than mere exposure; it is a social experience, too: You expose Me. In effect, social aspects of the situation, like the evaluation of the sound management procedure, influence the evaluation of sound. The laboratory experiment (N=90) investigates the effect of procedural unfairness on noise annoyance. The sound management procedure is varied systematically: Participants are promised they will listen to the sound of their choice (i.e., bird song, radio sound, or aircraft sound) but receive aircraft sound despite their expressed preference (unfair procedure), or they are simply told they will listen to aircraft sound (neutral procedure). All are exposed to aircraft sound (50 or 70 dBA Leq). A collective rise in noise annoyance is predicted in the unfair relative to the neutral procedure conditions. Results show that noise annoyance ratings are significantly higher in the unfair relative to the neutral conditions. Consequences for theory and practice are discussed.

    PMID: 18247757 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Annoyance due to single and combined sound exposure from railway and road traffic.
    Related Articles

    Annoyance due to single and combined sound exposure from railway and road traffic.

    J Acoust Soc Am. 2007 Nov;122(5):2642-52

    Authors: Ohrström E, Barregård L, Andersson E, Skånberg A, Svensson H, Angerheim P

    Abstract
    Environmental noise is a growing and well recognized health problem. However, in many cases people are exposed not to a single noise source-for example, road, railway, or aircraft noise-but to a combination of noise exposures and there is only limited knowledge of the effects on health of exposure to combined noise sources. A socio-acoustic survey among 1953 persons aged 18-75 years was conducted in residential areas exposed to railway and road traffic noise with sound levels ranging from L(Aeq,24h) 45-72 dB in a municipality east of Gothenburg, Sweden. The objectives were to assess various adverse health effects, including annoyance, and to elucidate the impact of exposure to single and combined noise sources. In areas exposed to both railway and road traffic, the proportion annoyed by the total traffic sound environment (total annoyance) was significantly higher than in areas with one dominant noise source (rail or road traffic) with the same total sound exposure (L(Aeq,24h,tot)). This interaction effect was significant from 59 dB and increased gradually with higher sound levels. Effects of the total sound exposure should be considered in risk assessments and in noise mitigation activities.

    PMID: 18189556 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • [Characteristics of a negative effect of aviation noise on hearing organ of aircraft maintenance personnel].
    Related Articles

    [Characteristics of a negative effect of aviation noise on hearing organ of aircraft maintenance personnel].

    Vestn Otorinolaringol. 2007;(6):25-9

    Authors: Zinkin VN, Soldatov SK, Sheshegov PM

    Abstract
    Otolaryngological examination was carried out of 80 engineers and technicians engaged in maintenance of aircrafts in the airports. They are continuously exposed to occupational aviation noise and therefore are at risk for chronic neurosensory hypoacusis. Pure tone audiogram registers in them a rise in hearing thresholds throughout the whole band of frequencies studied. This means that aviation maintenance staff is exposed to noise containing highly intensive infrasound and high-frequency components. The detected pathology directly correlated with duration of exposure to noise. Development of neurosensory hypoacusis in aviation maintenance specialists starts earlier than in other specialists exposed to noise.

    PMID: 18163089 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • [New potentials in assessment of the acoustic analyzer in occupational selection and certification of drivers].
    Related Articles

    [New potentials in assessment of the acoustic analyzer in occupational selection and certification of drivers].

    Vestn Otorinolaringol. 2007;(6):21-4

    Authors: Pankova VB, Tavartkiladze GA, Mukhamedova GR

    Abstract
    As there is a need now in modern, informative and objective methods of diagnosis of early changes in the acoustic analyzer of drivers exposed to intensive occupational noise. To develop such methods, we studied parameters of evoked otoacoustic emission with reference to age of the drivers and duration of occupational exposure to noise. We established characteristics of delayed evoked otoacoustic emission and evoked distortion product otoacoustic emission. These parameters can be used in occupational selection and certification of transport drivers as markers of initial signs of a negative noise effect on the hearing organ.

    PMID: 18163088 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Effects of binaural electronic hearing protectors on localization and response time to sounds in the horizontal plane.
    Related Articles

    Effects of binaural electronic hearing protectors on localization and response time to sounds in the horizontal plane.

    Noise Health. 2007 Oct-Dec;9(37):83-95

    Authors: Carmichel EL, Harris FP, Story BH

    Abstract
    The effects of electronic hearing protector devices (HPDs) on localization and response time (RT) to stimuli were assessed at six locations in the horizontal plane. The stimuli included a firearm loading, telephone ringing and .5-kHz and 4-kHz tonebursts presented during continuous traffic noise. Eight normally hearing adult listeners were evaluated under two conditions: (a) ears unoccluded; (b) ears occluded with one of three amplitude-sensitive sound transmission HPDs. All HPDs were found to affect localization, and performance was dependent on stimuli and location. Response time (RT) was less in the unoccluded condition than for any of the HPD conditions for the broadband stimuli. In the HPD conditions, RT to incorrect responses was significantly less than RT to correct responses for 120 degrees and 240 degrees , the two locations with the greatest number of errors. The RTs to incorrect responses were significantly greater than to correct responses for 60 degrees and 300 degrees , the two locations with the least number of errors. The HPDs assessed in this study did not preserve localization ability under most stimulus conditions.

    PMID: 18087114 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Assessing the acoustical climate of underground stations.
    Related Articles

    Assessing the acoustical climate of underground stations.

    Int J Occup Saf Ergon. 2007;13(4):427-31

    Authors: Nowicka E

    Abstract
    Designing a proper acoustical environment--indispensable to speech recognition--in long enclosures is difficult. Although there is some literature on the acoustical conditions in underground stations, there is still little information about methods that make estimation of correct reverberation conditions possible. This paper discusses the assessment of the reverberation conditions of underground stations. A comparison of the measurements of reverberation time in Warsaw's underground stations with calculated data proves there are divergences between measured and calculated early decay time values, especially for long source-receiver distances. Rapid speech transmission index values for measured stations are also presented.

    PMID: 18082025 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Wrocław's motorway ring-road--noise protection.
    Related Articles

    Wrocław's motorway ring-road--noise protection.

    Int J Occup Saf Ergon. 2007;13(4):399-408

    Authors: Rudno-Rudzińska B

    Abstract
    The 35.4-km stretch of the A8 motorway, i.e., Wrocław's motorway ring-road (WMRR), passes through the north-west part of the city of Wrocław and 4 neighbouring districts. Analyses have shown that WMRR will be a source of noise in the environment, which may adversely affect large areas. Normative environmental protection acts mandate taking all the necessary technical and organizational measures to reduce noise generated by the operation of WMRR in order to comply with the acoustic environment quality standards. The paper presents the research methodology adopted for assessing noise impact and designing acoustic barriers, and proposed designs of acoustic barriers which take into account the acoustic requirements, technical limitations, urban development, and architectural conditions.

    PMID: 18082022 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Effects of irrelevant speech and traffic noise on speech perception and cognitive performance in elementary school children.
    Related Articles

    Effects of irrelevant speech and traffic noise on speech perception and cognitive performance in elementary school children.

    Noise Health. 2007 Jul-Sep;9(36):64-74

    Authors: Klatte M, Meis M, Sukowski H, Schick A

    Abstract
    The effects of background noise of moderate intensity on short-term storage and processing of verbal information were analyzed in 6 to 8 year old children. In line with adult studies on "irrelevant sound effect" (ISE), serial recall of visually presented digits was severely disrupted by background speech that the children did not understand. Train noises of equal Intensity however, had no effect. Similar results were demonstrated with tasks requiring storage and processing of heard information. Memory for nonwords, execution of oral instructions and categorizing speech sounds were significantly disrupted by irrelevant speech. The affected functions play a fundamental role in the acquisition of spoken and written language. Implications concerning current models of the ISE and the acoustic conditions in schools and kindergardens are discussed.

    PMID: 18025757 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Hearing, communication and cognition in low-frequency noise from armoured vehicles.
    Related Articles

    Hearing, communication and cognition in low-frequency noise from armoured vehicles.

    Noise Health. 2007 Apr-Jun;9(35):35-41

    Authors: Nakashima A, Abel SM, Duncan M, Smith D

    Abstract
    An experiment was performed to study auditory perception and cognitive function in the presence of low-frequency dominant armoured vehicle noise (LAV III). Thirty-six normal hearing subjects were assigned to one of three noise backgrounds: Quiet, pink noise and vehicle noise. The pink and vehicle noise were presented at 80 dBA. Each subject performed an auditory detection test, modified rhyme test (MRT) and cognitive test battery for three different ear conditions: Unoccluded and fitted with an active noise reduction (ANR) headset in passive and ANR modes. Auditory detection was measured at six 1/3 octave band frequencies from 0.25 to 8 kHz. The cognitive test battery consisted of two subjective questionnaires and five performance tasks. The earmuff, both in the conventional and ANR modes, did not significantly affect detection thresholds at any frequency in the pink and vehicle noise backgrounds. For the MRT, there were no significant differences between the speech levels required for 60% correct responses for three ear conditions in the pink and vehicle noise backgrounds. A small but significant (4 dB) increase in speech level was required in pink noise as compared to vehicle noise. For the serial reaction time task, the mean response time in the vehicle noise background (751 ms) was significantly higher than in pink noise and quiet (709 and 651 ms, respectively). The mean response time in the pink noise background was also significantly higher than in quiet. Thus, the presence of noise, especially low-frequency noise, had a negative effect on reaction time.

    PMID: 18025753 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • The sound behind heart effects.
    Related Articles

    The sound behind heart effects.

    Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Nov;115(11):A536-7

    Authors: Mead MN

    PMID: 18007971 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Residential proximity to large airports and potential health impacts in New York State.
    Related Articles

    Residential proximity to large airports and potential health impacts in New York State.

    Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2008 Jul;81(7):797-804

    Authors: Lin S, Munsie JP, Herdt-Losavio M, Hwang SA, Civerolo K, McGarry K, Gentile T

    Abstract
    OBJECTIVE: This study assessed whether residents living near commercial airports have increased rates of hospital admissions due to respiratory diseases compared to those living farther away from these airports.
    METHODS: This cross-sectional study included all residents living within 12 miles from the center of each three airports (Rochester in Rochester, LaGuardia in New York City and MacArthur in Long Island). We obtained hospital admission data collected by the NYS Department of Health for all eligible residents who were admitted for asthma, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and, for children aged 0-4 years, bronchitis and bronchiolitis during 1995-2000. Exposure indicators were distance from the airport (< or =5 miles versus >5 miles) and dominant wind-flow patterns from the airport (>75th percentile versus < or =75th percentile), as well as their combinations.
    RESULTS: Increased relative risks of hospital admissions for respiratory conditions were found for residents living within 5 miles from the airports (1.47; 95% CI 1.41, 1.52 for Rochester and 1.38; 95% CI 1.37, 1.39 for LaGuardia) compared to those living >5 miles. We did not find positive associations between wind-flow patterns and respiratory hospital admissions among the residents in any airport vicinity. No differences were observed for MacArthur airport using either exposure measure.
    CONCLUSION: There is the suggestion that residential proximity to some airports may increase hospital admissions for respiratory disorders. However, there are many factors that could influence this association that may differ by airport, which should be measured and studied further.

    PMID: 17938951 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • The influence of sensitivity for road traffic noise on residential location: does it trigger a process of spatial selection?
    Related Articles

    The influence of sensitivity for road traffic noise on residential location: does it trigger a process of spatial selection?

    J Acoust Soc Am. 2007 Sep;122(3):1595

    Authors: Nijland HA, Hartemink S, van Kamp I, van Wee B

    Abstract
    People move to another house for different reasons. It is sometimes presumed that a process of self-selection might take place on the basis of noise sensitivity, i.e., sensitive people would either leave high noise areas or not move into these areas in the first place. Thus, a "survivor population" would remain in the high noise areas. This research aims to investigate whether such a process can be observed in the Netherlands. The study does not show evidence of a process of self-selection based on noise sensitivity. Nevertheless, the results suggest that noise-sensitive people are less satisfied with their living environment and are more willing to move than those who are not noise sensitive. Due to the limited sample size, external validity is limited.

    PMID: 17927418 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Aircraft noise and incidence of hypertension.
    Related Articles

    Aircraft noise and incidence of hypertension.

    Epidemiology. 2007 Nov;18(6):716-21

    Authors: Eriksson C, Rosenlund M, Pershagen G, Hilding A, Ostenson CG, Bluhm G

    Abstract
    BACKGROUND: An association between aircraft noise exposure and hypertension prevalence has been suggested but there are no longitudinal studies of this association. Our aim was to investigate the influence of aircraft noise on the incidence of hypertension.
    METHODS: A cohort of 2754 men in 4 municipalities around Stockholm Arlanda airport was followed between 1992-1994 and 2002-2004. The cohort was based on the Stockholm Diabetes Preventive Program; half of the study subjects had a family history of diabetes. Residential aircraft noise exposure (expressed as time-weighted equal energy and maximal noise levels) was assessed by geographical information systems techniques among those living near the airport. Incident cases of hypertension were identified by physical examinations, including blood pressure measurements, and questionnaires in which subjects reported treatment or diagnosis of hypertension and information on cardiovascular risk factors. Analyses were restricted to 2027 subjects who completed the follow-up examination, were not treated for hypertension, and had a blood pressure below 140/90 mm Hg at enrollment.
    RESULTS: For subjects exposed to energy-averaged levels above 50 dB(A) the adjusted relative risk for hypertension was 1.19 (95% CI = 1.03-1.37). Maximum aircraft noise levels presented similar results, with a relative risk of 1.20 (1.03-1.40) for those exposed above 70 dB(A). Stronger associations were suggested among older subjects, those with a normal glucose tolerance, nonsmokers, and subjects not annoyed by noise from other sources.
    CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that long-term aircraft noise exposure may increase the risk for hypertension.

    PMID: 17917607 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Prediction of noise changes due to traffic speed control.
    Related Articles

    Prediction of noise changes due to traffic speed control.

    J Acoust Soc Am. 2007 Oct;122(4):2074-81

    Authors: Makarewicz R, Kokowski P

    Abstract
    The effects of vehicle speed variation on road traffic noise are analyzed. The steady speed motion is replaced by deceleration, cruise, and acceleration. Because of a relatively loud acceleration noise, such a speed variation results not only in the noise decrease zones, but in the noise increase zones as well. The location of these zones depends slightly upon the ground covering (grass, concrete, etc.). Conversely, their boundaries change dramatically with the parameters describing noise emission during deceleration, cruise, and acceleration. For example, the Japanese and Polish models of noise emission have been applied. The critical length L(*) of the cruise segment of the road is introduced: for L>L(*) the sound energy decline (due to speed reduction) compensates the sound energy growth (due to acceleration). The results obtained could be useful for road administrators.

    PMID: 17902845 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Prediction of noise levels and annoyance from aircraft run-ups at Vancouver International Airport.
    Related Articles

    Prediction of noise levels and annoyance from aircraft run-ups at Vancouver International Airport.

    J Acoust Soc Am. 2007 Oct;122(4):1937-45

    Authors: Scherebnyj K, Hodgson M

    Abstract
    Annoyance complaints resulting from engine run-ups have been increasing at Vancouver International Airport for several years. To assist the Airport in managing run-up noise levels, a prediction tool based on a Green's function parabolic equation (GFPE) model has been consolidated, evaluated, and applied. It was extended to include more realistic atmospheric and ground input parameters. Measurements were made of the noise-radiation characteristics of a CRJ200 jet aircraft. The GFPE model was validated by comparing predictions with results in the literature. A sensitivity analysis showed that predicted levels are relatively insensitive to small variations in geometry and ground impedance, but relatively sensitive to variations in wind speed, atmosphere type, and aircraft heading and power setting. Predicted noise levels were compared with levels measured at noise monitoring terminals. For the four cases for which all input information was available, agreement was within 10 dBA. For events for which some information had to be estimated, predictions were within 20 dBA. The predicted annoyance corresponding to the run-up events considered ranged from 1.8% to 9.5% of people awoken, suggesting that noise complaints can be expected.

    PMID: 17902830 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Environmental equity and the role of public policy: experiences in the Rijnmond region.
    Related Articles

    Environmental equity and the role of public policy: experiences in the Rijnmond region.

    Environ Manage. 2007 Oct;40(4):578-95

    Authors: Kruize H, Driessen PP, Glasbergen P, van Egmond KN

    Abstract
    This study of environmental equity uses secondary quantitative data to analyze socioeconomic disparities in environmental conditions in the Rijnmond region of the Netherlands. The disparities of selected environmental indicators--exposure to traffic noise (road, rail, and air), NO(2), external safety risks, and the availability of public green space--are analyzed both separately and in combination. Not only exposures to environmental burdens ("bads") were investigated, but also access to environmental benefits ("goods"). Additionally, we held interviews and reviewed documents to grasp the mechanisms underlying the environmental equity situation, with an emphasis on the role of public policy. Environmental equity is not a priority in public policy for the greater Rotterdam region known as the Rijnmond region, yet environmental standards have been established to provide a minimum environmental quality to all local residents. In general, environmental quality has improved in this region, and the accumulation of negative environmental outcomes ("bads") has been limited. However, environmental standards for road traffic noise and NO(2) are being exceeded, probably because of the pressure on space and the traffic intensity. We found an association of environmental "bads" with income for rail traffic noise and availability of public green space. In the absence of regulation, positive environmental outcomes ("goods") are mainly left up to market forces. Consequently, higher-income groups generally have more access to environmental "goods" than lower-income groups.

    PMID: 17879127 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Aircraft noise: effects on macro- and microstructure of sleep.
    Related Articles

    Aircraft noise: effects on macro- and microstructure of sleep.

    Sleep Med. 2008 May;9(4):382-7

    Authors: Basner M, Glatz C, Griefahn B, Penzel T, Samel A

    Abstract
    OBJECTIVE: The effects of aircraft noise on sleep macrostructure (Rechtschaffen and Kales) and microstructure (American Sleep Disorders Association [ASDA] arousal criteria) were investigated.
    PATIENTS AND METHODS: For each of 10 subjects (mean age 35.3 years, 5 males), a baseline night without aircraft noise (control), and two nights with exposure to 64 noise events with a maximum sound pressure level (SPL) of either 45 or 65 dBA were chosen. Spontaneous and noise-induced alterations during sleep classified as arousals (ARS), changes to lighter sleep stages (CSS), awakenings including changes to sleep stage 1 (AS1), and awakenings (AWR) were analyzed.
    RESULTS: The number of events per night increased in the order AWR, AS1, CSS, and ARS under control conditions as well as under the two noise conditions. Furthermore, probabilities for sleep disruptions increased with increasing noise level. ARS were observed about fourfold compared to AWR, irrespective of control or noise condition.
    CONCLUSIONS: Under the conditions investigated, different sleep parameters show different sensitivities, but also different specificities for noise-induced sleep disturbances. We conclude that most information on sleep disturbances can be achieved by investigating robust classic parameters like AWR or AS1, although ASDA electroencephalographic (EEG) arousals might add relevant information in situations with low maximum SPLs, chronic sleep deprivation or chronic exposure.

    PMID: 17870661 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Urban road-traffic noise and blood pressure and heart rate in preschool children.
    Related Articles

    Urban road-traffic noise and blood pressure and heart rate in preschool children.

    Environ Int. 2008 Feb;34(2):226-31

    Authors: Belojevic G, Jakovljevic B, Stojanov V, Paunovic K, Ilic J

    Abstract
    Night time noise exposure has very rarely been used in previous studies on the relationship between community noise and children's blood pressure, although children spend a larger part of their night time sleeping at home than adults. For this reason, we focused on night time noise exposure at children's residences and daytime noise at kindergartens. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of urban road-traffic noise on children's blood pressure and heart rate. A cross-sectional study was performed on 328 preschool children (174 boys and 154 girls) aged 3-7 years, who attended 10 public kindergartens in Belgrade. Equivalent noise levels (Leq) were measured during night in front of children's residences and during day in front of kindergartens. A residence was regarded noisy if Leq exceeded 45 dB (A) during night and quiet if the Leq was < or =45 dB (A). Noisy and quiet kindergartens were those with daily Leq>60 dB (A) and < or =60 dB (A), respectively. Children's blood pressure was measured with mercury sphygmomanometer. Heart rate was counted by radial artery palpitation for 1 min. The prevalence of children with hypertensive values of blood pressure was 3.96% (13 children, including 8 boys and 5 girls) with higher prevalence in children from noisy residences (5.70%), compared to children from quiet residences (1.48%). The difference was borderline significant (p=0.054). Systolic pressure was significantly higher (5 mm Hg on average) among children from noisy residences and kindergartens, compared to children from both quiet environments (p<0.01). Heart rate was significantly higher (2 beats/min on average) in children from noisy residences, compared to children from quiet residences (p<0.05). Multiple regression, after allowing for possible confounders, showed a significant correlation between noise exposure and children's systolic pressure (B=1.056; p=0.009).

    PMID: 17869340 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • The development of the noise sensitivity questionnaire.
    Related Articles

    The development of the noise sensitivity questionnaire.

    Noise Health. 2007 Jan-Mar;9(34):15-24

    Authors: Schütte M, Marks A, Wenning E, Griefahn B

    Abstract
    The existing questionnaires for determining the noise sensitivity of individuals provide information only about global noise sensitivity, although empirical data suggest that measuring noise sensitivity for different situations in daily life might be more logical. Therefore, the "Noise-Sensitivity-Questionnaire" (NoiSeQ) was developed to measure global noise sensitivity as well as the sensitivity of five domains of daily life, namely, leisure, work, habitation, communication, and sleep. The assessment of the measurement characteristics was based on the Generalizability (G) theory. The results of the G-study (N=66) proved that a single application of the questionnaire is sufficient for determining an individual's noise sensitivity. Furthermore, the ratings are age and gender independent. The subsequently conducted Decision (D)-study (N=288) provides information on the reliability of NoiSeQ. If the questionnaire is used for measuring global noise sensitivity, the reliability (relative and absolute G-coefficient) reaches a value above 0.90. According to ISO 10075-3, the questionnaire satisfies the precision level 1 "accurate measurement" in this case. The G-coefficients for all the subscales exceed the lower limit 0.70, with the exception of subscale leisure, which did not prove satisfactory. However, this subscale can reach a reliability of more than 0.70 if additional items are included. The validity of the instrument was proven for the subscales habitation (N=72) and work (N=72). In both the studies, the participants were asked to rate the annoyance in the presence of several rail and traffic noise scenarios. The subjects were characterized as low and high noise sensitive according to their sensitivity values obtained from NoiSeQ. In conclusion, a significant difference in annoyance rates was observed between the low and high noise sensitive groups for both the subscales habitation and work. This data support the validity of NoiSeQ.

    PMID: 17851223 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • The reliability of the noise sensitivity questionnaire in a cross-national analysis.
    Related Articles

    The reliability of the noise sensitivity questionnaire in a cross-national analysis.

    Noise Health. 2007 Jan-Mar;9(34):8-14

    Authors: Sandrock S, Schütte M, Griefahn B

    Abstract
    Noise sensitivity is regarded as a relevant predictor for annoyance reactions. Since many studies have focused on noise sensitivity at an international level, the present analysis was conducted to detect national peculiarities concerning noise sensitivity. Using the approach of the generalizability theory, reliability of the noise sensitivity questionnaire was analyzed taking into consideration relevant facets assumed to contribute to the measurement error. A total of 126 individuals from seven European countries participated in this study. The reliability coefficients for the global noise sensitivity score ranged from 0.90 to 0.91. It was determined that the translated questionnaires are comparable.

    PMID: 17851222 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Associations between noise sensitivity and sleep, subjectively evaluated sleep quality, annoyance, and performance after exposure to nocturnal traffic noise.
    Related Articles

    Associations between noise sensitivity and sleep, subjectively evaluated sleep quality, annoyance, and performance after exposure to nocturnal traffic noise.

    Noise Health. 2007 Jan-Mar;9(34):1-7

    Authors: Marks A, Griefahn B

    Abstract
    In order to determine the influence of noise sensitivity on sleep, subjective sleep quality, annoyance, and performance after nocturnal exposure to traffic noise, 12 women and 12 men (age range, 19-28 years) were observed during four consecutive nights over a three weeks period. After a habituation night, the participants were exposed with weekly permuted changes to air, rail and road traffic noise. Of the four nights, one was a quiet night (32 dBA), while three were noisy nights with exposure to equivalent noise levels of 39, 44, and 50 dBA in a permuted order. The traffic noise caused alterations of most of the physiological parameters, subjective evaluation of sleep, annoyance, and performance. Correlations were found between noise sensitivity and subjective sleep quality in terms of worsened restoration, decreased calmness, difficulty to fall asleep, and body movements. The results suggest that alterations of subjective evaluation of sleep were determined by physical parameters of the noise but modified by individual factors like noise sensitivity.

    PMID: 17851221 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Modeling of the roundabout noise impact.
    Related Articles

    Modeling of the roundabout noise impact.

    J Acoust Soc Am. 2007 Aug;122(2):860-8

    Authors: Makarewicz R, Golebiewski R

    Abstract
    A roundabout is a very popular tool used by town planners for carrying smooth and stationary road traffic flow. In this study it is shown that the replacement of a classical road intersection by a roundabout, under certain conditions, may produce a traffic noise decrease. These conditions are expressed in terms of the roundabout speed and the receiver location. The A-weighted sound exposure level is used to describe noise reduction.

    PMID: 17672636 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • [Urban noise and myocardial infarction in the population].
    Related Articles

    [Urban noise and myocardial infarction in the population].

    Srp Arh Celok Lek. 2007 May-Jun;135(5-6):367-70

    Authors: Belojević G, Jakovljević B, Stojanov V, Paunović K, Ilić J

    Abstract
    Recent studies have pointed out a relation between urban noise and the occurrence of myocardial infarction in population. Public health importance of these results derives from the fact that 20% of the European population and 31% of the Japanese are exposed to equivalent noise levels exceeding 65 dBA, considered as "black acoustic zones" according to OECD criteria. Prospective epidemiological studies have found relative risks for myocardial infarction in these urban zones from 1.1 do 1.5. In studies with noise annoyance as an exposure indicator, interval of relative risks for myocardial infarction has been from 0.8 do 2.7 for persons with high degree of noise annoyance compared to those without noise disturbance.

    PMID: 17633330 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Recreational boating traffic: a chronic source of anthropogenic noise in the Wilmington, North Carolina Intracoastal Waterway.
    Related Articles

    Recreational boating traffic: a chronic source of anthropogenic noise in the Wilmington, North Carolina Intracoastal Waterway.

    J Acoust Soc Am. 2007 Jul;122(1):151-60

    Authors: Haviland-Howell G, Frankel AS, Powell CM, Bocconcelli A, Herman RL, Sayigh LS

    Abstract
    The majority of attention on the impact of anthropogenic noise on marine mammals has focused on low-frequency episodic activities. Persistent sources of mid-frequency noise pollution are less well studied. To address this data gap, the contribution of 25 physical, biological and anthropogenic factors to the ambient noise levels in the Wilmington, North Carolina Intracoastal Waterway were analyzed using a principal components analysis and least squares regression. The total number of recreational vessels passing through the waterway per hour is the factor that had the single greatest influence on environmental noise levels. During times of high boat traffic, anthropogenic noise is continuous rather than episodic, and occurs at frequencies that are biologically relevant to bottlenose dolphins. As a daily part of resident bottlenose dolphins' acoustic environment, recreational boating traffic may represent a chronic source of acoustic harassment.

    PMID: 17614475 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Spatial distribution of traffic induced noise exposures in a US city: an analytic tool for assessing the health impacts of urban planning decisions.
    Related Articles

    Spatial distribution of traffic induced noise exposures in a US city: an analytic tool for assessing the health impacts of urban planning decisions.

    Int J Health Geogr. 2007;6:24

    Authors: Seto EY, Holt A, Rivard T, Bhatia R

    Abstract
    BACKGROUND: Vehicle traffic is the major source of noise in urban environments, which in turn has multiple impacts on health. In this paper we investigate the spatial distribution of community noise exposures and annoyance. Traffic data from the City of San Francisco were used to model noise exposure by neighborhood and road type. Remote sensing data were used in the model to estimate neighborhood-specific percentages of cars, trucks, and buses on arterial versus non-arterial streets. The model was validated on 235 streets. Finally, an exposure-response relationship was used to predict the prevalence of high annoyance for different neighborhoods.
    RESULTS: Urban noise was found to increase 6.7 dB (p < 0.001) with 10-fold increased street traffic, with important contributors to noise being bus and heavy truck traffic. Living along arterial streets also increased risk of annoyance by 40%. The relative risk of annoyance in one of the City's fastest growing neighborhoods, the South of Market Area, was found to be 2.1 times that of lowest noise neighborhood. However, higher densities of exposed individuals were found in Chinatown and Downtown/Civic Center. Overall, we estimated that 17% of the city's population was at risk of high annoyance from traffic noise.
    CONCLUSION: The risk of annoyance from urban noise is large, and varies considerably between neighborhoods. Such risk should be considered in urban areas undergoing rapid growth. We present a relatively simple GIS-based noise model that may be used for routinely evaluating the health impacts of environmental noise.

    PMID: 17584947 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Environmental noise-exposed workers: event-related potentials, neuropsychological and mood assessment.
    Related Articles

    Environmental noise-exposed workers: event-related potentials, neuropsychological and mood assessment.

    Int J Psychophysiol. 2007 Sep;65(3):228-37

    Authors: Chiovenda P, Pasqualetti P, Zappasodi F, Ercolani M, Milazzo D, Tomei G, Capozzella A, Tomei F, Rossini PM, Tecchio F

    Abstract
    Prolonged environmental noise exposure can induce pathogenic effects on various physical and psychosocial responses. The first aim of this study was to investigate whether long-term occupational noise exposure could affect neurophysiological, neuropsychological and emotional statuses, with particular respect to attention and working memory. The second aim was to evaluate the effects on the tactile P300 of a specific stressor (background traffic noise) vs a non-specific stress inductor (Stroop test). The comparison between a group of noise-exposed workers (traffic police officers), and a control group (office employees) did not show marked differences in cognitive and emotional profiles. The amplitude of the baseline cognitive potential (P300), recorded during a tactile (electric) discrimination task, resulted higher in noise-exposed workers than in controls, and this enhancement was associated with a lower level of trait anxiety and better mood profiles. Moreover, we found a wider P300 amplitude reduction in traffic police officers than in controls, under noisy conditions due to traffic. The effect of the Stroop test as a stress inductor was negligible and similar in the two groups. The wider amplitude of the non-auditory P300 in traffic police officers in the baseline condition could be a sign of cross-modal cerebral plasticity enhancing attentive processes in the 'stress-free' sensory channel. In addition, noise-exposed workers presented a higher cerebral sensitivity to stress selectively when they were exposed to the habitual environmental stressor.

    PMID: 17544162 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Assessment of personal noise exposure of overhead-traveling crane drivers in steel-rolling mills.
    Related Articles

    Assessment of personal noise exposure of overhead-traveling crane drivers in steel-rolling mills.

    Chin Med J (Engl). 2007 Apr 20;120(8):684-9

    Authors: Zeng L, Chai DL, Li HJ, Lei Z, Zhao YM

    Abstract
    BACKGROUND: Noise is widespread occupational hazard in iron and steel industry. Overhead-traveling cranes are widely used in this industry, but few studies characterized the overhead-traveling crane drivers' noise exposure level so far. In this study, we assessed and characterized personal noise exposure levels of overhead-traveling crane drivers in two steel-rolling mills.
    METHODS: One hundred and twenty-four overhead-traveling crane drivers, 76 in the cold steel-rolling mill and 48 in the hot steel-rolling mill, were enrolled in the study. Personal noise dosimeters (AIHUA Instruments Model AWA5610e, Hangzhou, China) were used to collect full-shift noise exposure data from all the participants. Crane drivers carried dosimeters with microphones placed near their collars during the work shifts. Work logs had been taken by the drivers simultaneously. Personal noise exposure data were divided into segments based on lines in which they worked. All statistical analyses were done using SPSS 13.0.
    RESULTS: The average personal noise exposure (L(Aeq.8h)) of overhead-traveling crane drivers in the hot steel-rolling mills ((85.03 +/- 2.25) dB (A)) was higher than that in the cold one ((83.05 +/- 2.93) dB (A), P < 0.001). There were 17 overhead traveling cranes in the hot steel-rolling mill and 24 cranes in the cold one, of which carrying capacities varied from 15 tons to 100 tons. The average noise exposure level based on different lines in the hot and cold steel-rolling mills were (85.2 +/- 2.61) dB (A) and (83.3 +/- 3.10) dB (A) respectively (P = 0.001), which were similar to the average personal noise exposure in both mills. The noise exposure levels were different among different lines (P = 0.021).
    CONCLUSION: Noise exposure levels, depending upon background noise levels and the noise levels on the ground, are inconstant. As the noise exposure levels are above the 85 dB (A) criteria, these drivers should be involved in the Hearing Conservation Program to protect their hearing.

    PMID: 17517185 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Hypertension and road traffic noise exposure.
    Related Articles

    Hypertension and road traffic noise exposure.

    J Occup Environ Med. 2007 May;49(5):484-92

    Authors: de Kluizenaar Y, Gansevoort RT, Miedema HM, de Jong PE

    Abstract
    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between road traffic noise exposure at home and the prevalence of hypertension.
    METHODS: We conducted cross-sectional analyses in a large random sample (N=40,856) of inhabitants of Groningen City, and in a subsample (the Prevention of Renal and Vascular End-Stage Disease [PREVEND]) study cohort; N=8592).
    RESULTS: Before adjustment for confounders, road traffic noise exposure was associated with self-reported use of antihypertensive medication in the city of Groningen sample (odds ratio [OR]=1.31 per 10-dB increase in Lden). Adjusted odds ratios were significant for the subjects between 45 and 55 years old in the full model when adjusted for PM10 (OR=1.19) and at higher exposure (Lden >55 dB) only (OR=1.21; with adjustment for PM10, OR=1.31). In the PREVEND cohort, the unadjusted odds ratio was 1.35 for hypertension (systolic and diastolic blood pressure >140 and >90 mm Hg, respectively, or use of antihypertensive medication). Again, the adjusted odds ratio was significant for subjects between 45 and 55 years old (OR=1.27; with adjustment for PM10, OR=1.39).
    CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to road traffic noise may be associated with hypertension in subjects who are between 45 and 55 years old. Associations seemed to be stronger at higher noise levels.

    PMID: 17495691 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • [The influence of highly intensive aviation noise on hemodynamic indices in air forces engineering-and-technical staff].
    Related Articles

    [The influence of highly intensive aviation noise on hemodynamic indices in air forces engineering-and-technical staff].

    Voen Med Zh. 2007 Jan;328(1):52-7

    Authors: Ushakov IB, Zinkin VN, Soldatov SK, Remizov IuI, Zueva LV, Sheshegov PM, Kvasovka VV

    PMID: 17436715 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Noise perception, heart rate and blood pressure in relation to aircraft noise in the vicinity of the Frankfurt airport.
    Related Articles

    Noise perception, heart rate and blood pressure in relation to aircraft noise in the vicinity of the Frankfurt airport.

    Clin Res Cardiol. 2007 Jun;96(6):347-58

    Authors: Aydin Y, Kaltenbach M

    Abstract
    UNLABELLED: The aim of this study was to evaluate subjective noise perception and objective parameters of circulation in the vicinity of the Frankfurt airport. Two areas were selected in which aircraft noise was the predominant source of noise (and was) created by planes induced by take off but not during landing. Data of residents living in the two areas were observed over a period of twelve weeks, one area being exposed to air traffic noise for three quarters of the given time, the other for one quarter of the time.
    METHODS: Fifty three volunteers (age 50-52 +/- 15 y) monitored their blood pressure and heart rate over a period of three months by using an automatic device with digitized readings. They also protocolled their own subjective perception of noise and sleep quality. Thirty one probands were living West of the airport (West group) and were exposed to a nocturnal equivalent continuous air traffic noise level of L(eq(3)) = 50 dB(A) outside, during flight direction 25 to the West. Twenty two probands were living East of the airport (East group) and were exposed to L(eq(3)) = 50 dB (A) during flight direction 07 to the East. During the opposite flight directions air craft noise corresponded to L(eq(3)) = 40 dB(A) in both areas. Frankfurt airport operates direction 25 for about 75% of the time on average and direction 07 for 25% of the time.
    RESULTS: The average blood pressure was significantly higher in the West group with higher noise exposure. Morning systolic blood pressure was 10 mmHg and diastolic pressure 8 mmHg higher in the West group. Throughout the observation period, the East group showed a parallel between daily changes in noise and subjective noise perception. In the West group such a parallel did not appear. This reaction was considered to be the consequence of the high noise exposure of the West group.
    CONCLUSIONS: It is concluded that a population exposed to a nocturnal equivalent continuous air traffic noise level of L(eq(3)) = 50 dB(A) for three quarters of a given time has a higher average blood pressure compared to a population exposed to the same equal energy noise level for only one quarter of the time. Within the East group a parallel between noise exposure and noise perception was observed, while in the West group this parallel did not appear. The difference is considered to be the consequence of higher noise stress levels in the West group. The data are in accordance with recent epidemiological studies and indicate that a nocturnal aircraft noise of L(eq(3)) = 50 dB(A) can have negative effects on subjective noise perception and on objective parameters of circulation.

    PMID: 17393058 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Air pollution due to traffic, air quality monitoring along three sections of National Highway N-5, Pakistan.
    Related Articles

    Air pollution due to traffic, air quality monitoring along three sections of National Highway N-5, Pakistan.

    Environ Monit Assess. 2008 Jan;136(1-3):219-26

    Authors: Ali M, Athar M

    Abstract
    Transportation system has contributed significantly to the development of human civilization; on the other hand it has an enormous impact on the ambient air quality in several ways. In this paper the air and noise pollution at selected sites along three sections of National Highway was monitored. Pakistan National Highway Authority has started a Highway Improvement program for rehabilitations and maintenance of National highways to improve the traffic flows, and would ultimately improve the air quality along highways. The ambient air quality and noise level was monitored at nine different locations along these sections of highways to quantify the air pollution. The duration of monitoring at individual location was 72 h. The most of the sampling points were near the urban or village population, schools or hospitals, in order to quantify the air pollution at most affected locations along these roads. A database consisting of information regarding the source of emission, local metrology and air quality may be created to assess the profile of air quality in the area.

    PMID: 17385053 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • On the potential limitations of conventional sound metrics in quantifying perception of nonlinearly propagated noise.
    Related Articles

    On the potential limitations of conventional sound metrics in quantifying perception of nonlinearly propagated noise.

    J Acoust Soc Am. 2007 Jan;121(1):EL1-7

    Authors: Gee KL, Swift SH, Sparrow VW, Plotkin KJ, Downing JM

    Abstract
    The use of conventional metrics to quantify the perception of nonlinearly propagated noise has been studied. Gaussian noise waveforms have been numerically propagated both linearly and nonlinearly, and from the resulting waveforms, several metrics are calculated. These metrics are overall, A-, C-, and D-weighted sound pressure levels, perceived noise level, Stevens Mark VII perceived loudness, Zwicker loudness, and sharpness. Informal listening demonstrations indicate that perceived differences in annoyance between linearly and nonlinearly propagated waveforms are substantial. Because the metrics studied seem inadequate in representing the perceived differences, rigorous subjective testing is encouraged to properly quantify and understand these differences.

    PMID: 17297819 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Local feedback control of light honeycomb panels.
    Related Articles

    Local feedback control of light honeycomb panels.

    J Acoust Soc Am. 2007 Jan;121(1):222-33

    Authors: Hong C, Elliott SJ

    Abstract
    This paper summarizes theoretical and experimental work on the feedback control of sound radiation from honeycomb panels using piezoceramic actuators. It is motivated by the problem of sound transmission in aircraft, specifically the active control of trim panels. Trim panels are generally honeycomb structures designed to meet the design requirement of low weight and high stiffness. They are resiliently mounted to the fuselage for the passive reduction of noise transmission. Local coupling of the closely spaced sensor and actuator was observed experimentally and modeled using a single degree of freedom system. The effect of the local coupling was to roll off the response between the actuator and sensor at high frequencies, so that a feedback control system can have high gain margins. Unfortunately, only relatively poor global performance is then achieved because of localization of reduction around the actuator. This localization prompts the investigation of a multichannel active control system. Globalized reduction was predicted using a model of 12-channel direct velocity feedback control. The multichannel system, however, does not appear to yield a significant improvement in the performance because of decreased gain margin.

    PMID: 17297778 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Review of field studies of aircraft noise-induced sleep disturbance.
    Related Articles

    Review of field studies of aircraft noise-induced sleep disturbance.

    J Acoust Soc Am. 2007 Jan;121(1):32-41

    Authors: Michaud DS, Fidell S, Pearsons K, Campbell KC, Keith SE

    Abstract
    Aircraft noise-induced sleep disturbance (AN-ISD) is potentially among the more serious effects of aircraft noise on people. This literature review of recent field studies of AN-ISD finds that reliable generalization of findings to population-level effects is complicated by individual differences among subjects, methodological and analytic differences among studies, and predictive relationships that account for only a small fraction of the variance in the relationship between noise exposure and sleep disturbance. It is nonetheless apparent in the studied circumstances of residential exposure that sleep disturbance effects of nighttime aircraft noise intrusions are not dramatic on a per-event basis, and that linkages between outdoor aircraft noise exposure and sleep disturbance are tenuous. It is also apparent that AN-ISD occurs more often during later than earlier parts of the night; that indoor sound levels are more closely associated with sleep disturbance than outdoor measures; and that spontaneous awakenings, or awakenings attributable to nonaircraft indoor noises, occur more often than awakenings attributed to aircraft noise. Predictions of sleep disturbance due to aircraft noise should not be based on over-simplifications of the findings of the reviewed studies, and these reports should be treated with caution in developing regulatory policy for aircraft noise.

    PMID: 17297758 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Personal noise ranking of road traffic: subjective estimation versus physiological parameters under laboratory conditions.
    Related Articles

    Personal noise ranking of road traffic: subjective estimation versus physiological parameters under laboratory conditions.

    Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2007 Mar;210(2):97-105

    Authors: Raggam RB, Cik M, Höldrich RR, Fallast K, Gallasch E, Fend M, Lackner A, Marth E

    Abstract
    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the subjective estimation of noise-induced discomfort and its correlation to psychoacoustic and physiological parameters under laboratory conditions. To establish an effective description of sound qualities of road traffic noise, supplementing the current standards and calculation specifications.
    METHODS: Pass-by vehicle noise samples were binaurally recorded with a dummy head measurement system, and synthetically composed to six vehicle ensembles considering different road beds, varying speed profiles and noise barriers. Fifty-one persons were selected and tested under laboratory conditions. Study participants were exposed to defined acoustic stimuli, alternating with neutral phases lacking acoustic content in a listening room. Concomitant recording of electrocardiogram (ECG) and respiratory rate was performed. Subjective estimation of noise-induced discomfort of assigned vehicle ensembles was rated on a personal ranking scale (PRS) by the study subjects. Subjective ratings were combined with objective psychoacoustic parameters by multiple regression analysis.
    RESULTS: Heart rate was increased during all noise exposure phases compared to neutral phases; the increase of heart rate differed among vehicle ensembles and was statistically significant in two cases (p<0.01). Respiratory rate remained unaffected. Personal rankings also differed among vehicle ensembles and correlated well with objective psychoacoustic parameters (p<0.0001); e.g., loudness combined with roughness describes the correlation with subjective estimation of noise-induced discomfort better than the A-weighted sound level. Vehicle ensembles rated more unpleasant caused higher increases in heart rate as well (p<0.0001).
    CONCLUSIONS: The sound quality of road traffic noise as it is described by various psychoacoustic parameters not only determines the subjective estimation of noise-induced discomfort but in addition affects physiological parameters like heart rate. This should be considered for future perspectives in road- and traffic planning and therefore may serve construction engineers as well as traffic planner as a supplemental tool.

    PMID: 17084667 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Road traffic noise and hypertension.
    Related Articles

    Road traffic noise and hypertension.

    Occup Environ Med. 2007 Feb;64(2):122-6

    Authors: Leon Bluhm G, Berglind N, Nordling E, Rosenlund M

    Abstract
    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that noise exposure increases the risk of hypertension. Road traffic is the dominant source of community noise exposure.
    OBJECTIVE: To study the association between exposure to residential road traffic noise and hypertension in an urban municipality.
    METHODS: The study population comprised randomly selected subjects aged 19-80 years. A postal questionnaire provided information on individual characteristics, including diagnosis of hypertension. The response rate was 77%, resulting in a study population of 667 subjects. The outdoor equivalent traffic noise level (Leq 24 h) at the residence of each individual was determined using noise-dispersion models and manual noise assessments. The individual noise exposure was classified in units of 5 dB(A), from <45 dB(A) to >65 dB(A).
    RESULTS: The odds ratio (OR) for hypertension adjusted for age, smoking, occupational status and house type was 1.38 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06 to 1.80) per 5 dB(A) increase in noise exposure. The association seemed stronger among women (OR 1.71; 95% CI 1.17 to 2.50) and among those who had lived at the address for >10 years (OR 1.93; 95% CI 1.29 to 2.83). Analyses of categorical exposure variables suggested an exposure-response relationship. The strongest association between exposure to traffic noise and hypertension was found among those with the least expected misclassification of true individual exposure, as indicated by not having triple-glazed windows, living in an old house and having the bedroom window facing a street (OR 2.47; 95% CI 1.38 to 4.43).
    CONCLUSION: The results of our study suggest an association between exposure to residential road traffic noise and hypertension.

    PMID: 17053022 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Nach oben